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Leigh A. LaClair named deputy chief facilities officer


   

Leigh A. LaClair Leigh A. LaClair

BLACKSBURG, Va., Nov. 18, 2011 – Leigh A. LaClair, former interim associate vice chancellor, facilities management services, for the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), has been named deputy chief facilities officer at Virginia Tech. She will begin her new position Monday, Nov. 28

Reporting to the associate vice president and chief facilities officer, LaClair will be responsible for the coordination of the administrative, operational, and financial affairs of Facilities Services and will provide support for the technical and business matters pertaining to the wide scope of responsibilities and operating units within Facilities Services. She will also have direct management over the Office of Sustainability and the Facilities Services Occupational Safety Program.

At Virginia Tech, Facilities Services includes the offices of Campus Planning, Facilities Finance, Facilities Operations, University Building Official, University Planning, Transportation and Campus Services, University Design and Construction, and Utilities.

As the interim associate vice chancellor of facilities management services for the VCCS since 2010, LaClair was responsible for all facilities-related issues for more than 8.8 million-square-feet of academic space. She managed all capital outlay programs for the entire 40-campus community college system.

From 2005 to 2010, LaClair was director of facilities operations at John Tyler Community College in Richmond, Va., and served as capital outlay program manager for VCCS from 1994 to 2005. She also served as capital outlay program manager for the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation from 1989 to 1994 and as facilities project manager for Signet Bank in Richmond from 1980 to 1988.

LaClair is a member of the Virginia Society of Landscape Designers and Pi Alpha Alpha Honor Society. She is a LEED-accredited professional and a certified Virginia construction contracting officer.

She received her bachelor’s degree in horticulture from Virginia Tech and a master’s degree from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Dedicated to its motto, Ut Prosim (That I May Serve), Virginia Tech takes a hands-on, engaging approach to education, preparing scholars to be leaders in their fields and communities. As the commonwealth’s most comprehensive university and its leading research institution, Virginia Tech offers 225 undergraduate and graduate degree programs to more than 31,000 students and manages a research portfolio of $496 million. The university fulfills its land-grant mission of transforming knowledge to practice through technological leadership and by fueling economic growth and job creation locally, regionally, and across Virginia.