Return to Skip Menu

Main Content

Maury Nussbaum reappointed as Hal G. Prillaman Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering


   

Maury Nussbaum Maury Nussbaum

BLACKSBURG, Va., Sept. 2, 2011 – Maury Nussbaum, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been appointed as the Hal G. Prillaman Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

The Hal G. Prillaman Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering was established by and is named for a 1965 industrial engineering graduate who now is a member of the Industrial and Systems Engineering Academy of Distinguished Alumni.

Nussbaum will retain the professorship for a period of five years.

Nussbaum began his career at Virginia Tech as an assistant professor in 1996. He has developed and taught innovative courses in industrial and systems engineering to hundreds of students. He has established a world-class research program in occupational injury prevention, with specific emphasis on occupational biomechanics, the modeling of lumbar spine kinetics and kinematics, artificial neural networks, industrial ergonomics and work physiology, and related topics.

Nussbaum has advised more than 35 graduate students, has authored or co-authored more than 95 journal articles, and has participated as principal investigator or co-principal investigator on more than $15 million in funded research projects.

Nussbaum received his bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, and a Ph.D. from The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Dedicated to its motto, Ut Prosim (That I May Serve), Virginia Tech takes a hands-on, engaging approach to education, preparing scholars to be leaders in their fields and communities. As the commonwealth’s most comprehensive university and its leading research institution, Virginia Tech offers 225 undergraduate and graduate degree programs to more than 31,000 students and manages a research portfolio of $496 million. The university fulfills its land-grant mission of transforming knowledge to practice through technological leadership and by fueling economic growth and job creation locally, regionally, and across Virginia.