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Youth compete at State 4-H Livestock Judging Contest at Virginia Tech


   

Top 10 individuals placing in the senior division The top 10 individuals placing in the senior division overall. Back row from left to right: Emily Dyer, Madison County, 10th place; Jessie Bramhall, Loudoun County, ninth place; Jack Redifer, Montgomery County, eighth place; John Clouse, Montgomery County, seventh place; and Jordan McCammon, Rockingham County, first place. Front row from left to right: Chelsea Ellington, Rockingham County, sixth place; Keagan Clevenger, Frederick County, fifth place; Colby Redifer, Montgomery County, fourth place; Madison Slaven, Augusta County, third place; and Coffman Liggett, Augusta County, second, place.


BLACKSBURG, Va., Aug. 4, 2011 – More than 130 young people from across the Commonwealth of Virginia gathered on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg for the State 4-H Livestock Judging Contest on June 29. 

Contestants competing in the state contest are required to judge eight classes of livestock, including three classes of cattle, three of swine, and two of sheep. Senior contestants present three sets of reasons (one each for cattle, swine, and sheep). Junior contestants give one set of reasons. Contestants are also required answer questions on some of the classes.

“Livestock judging provides youth with numerous life skills that make a positive impact on their lives. It teaches them how to be critical thinkers and problems solvers; these skills are crucial for career success,” said Paige Pratt, 4-H youth Extension specialist. “Additionally, through giving oral reasons, youth learn how to present and defend their opinions. They will use these skills as they interview for jobs and publically present in their careers.”

Results from the junior contest for youth ages 9-13 are as follows:

The first-place junior team was Frederick County, followed by Orange County in second, Rockingham County in third, Augusta County in fourth, and Rockbridge County in fifth place.

The top 10 individuals placing in the junior division overall were:

  • First place:       Hunter Watkins, Orange County
  • Second place:   Cody Boden, Frederick County
  • Third place:     Amanda Bowman, Montgomery County
  • Fourth place:    Sarah Harris, Rockbridge County
  • Fifth place:      Makalyn Nesselrodt, Rockingham County
  • Sixth place:      Caleb Boden, Frederick County
  • Seventh place:  Bailey Hadacek, Augusta Coutny
  • Eighth place:    Colton Buchanan, Augusta County
  • Ninth place:     Michael Robinson, Carroll County
  • 10th place:       Bailey Carpenter, Rockingham County

In the senior division, youth ages 14-18, the first-place team was Augusta County, followed by Montgomery County in second place, Rockingham County in third, Loudoun County in fourth, and Orange County in fifth. 

The top 10 individuals placing in the senior division overall were:

  • First place:       Jordan McCammon, Rockingham County
  • Second place:   Coffman Liggett, Augusta County
  • Third place:     Madison Slaven, Augusta County
  • Fourth place:    Colby Redifer, Montgomery County
  • Fifth place:      Keagan Clevenger, Frederick County
  • Sixth place:      Chelsea Ellington, Rockingham County
  • Seventh place:  John Clouse, Montgomery County
  • Eighth place:    Jack Redifer, Montgomery County
  • Ninth place:     Jessie Bramhall, Loudoun County
  • 10th place:       Emily Dyer, Madison County

The top eight senior individuals will compete on the team representing Virginia at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Ky., in November. The 4-H Livestock Endowment will furnish travel and lodging for the team. To assist the Virginia team or for more information regarding youth livestock events supported by the endowment, contact Paige Pratt, 4-H youth Extension specialist, at 540-231-4732.

Virginia Cooperative Extension brings the resources of Virginia's land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, to the people of the commonwealth. Through a system of on-campus specialists and locally based educators, it delivers education in the areas of agriculture and natural resources, family and consumer sciences, community viability, and 4-H youth development. With a network of faculty at two universities, 107 county and city offices, 11 agricultural research and Extension centers, and six 4-H educational centers, Virginia Cooperative Extension provides solutions to the problems facing Virginians today.