Return to Skip Menu

Main Content

Michael Kiser named director of development communications


BLACKSBURG, Va., Dec. 5, 2005 – Michael Kiser of Blacksburg, Va., former director of communications at Patrick Henry College, has been named director of development communications at Virginia Tech.

As director of development communications, Kiser will lead a team responsible for the development and implementation of a comprehensive communications program in support of fund raising efforts at the university. Specific responsibilities include overseeing the design, writing and production of fund raising materials and related publications, providing communication support for university events, and writing and editorial oversight for a variety of written communications.

As director of communications at Patrick Henry College, Kiser served as editorial and creative director for all college communications, including the college’s website and media relations programs. From 1999 to 2004, Kiser served as director of media relations at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College. From 2002 to 2004, he concurrently held the position of acting director of communications, overseeing all communication programs and strategies at the college.

Kiser is also owner of Writer’s Ink, a writing, editing and marketing firm. He received his bachelor’s degree from Wabash College and a master’s degree from Purdue University.

Founded in 1872 as a land-grant college, Virginia Tech has grown to become among the largest universities in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Today, Virginia Tech’s eight colleges are dedicated to putting knowledge to work through teaching, research, and outreach activities and to fulfilling its vision to be among the top research universities in the nation. At its 2,600-acre main campus located in Blacksburg and other campus centers in Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia, Hampton Roads, Richmond, and Roanoke, Virginia Tech enrolls more than 28,000 full- and part-time undergraduate and graduate students from all 50 states and more than 100 countries in 180 academic degree programs.



Article from