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College of Engineering honors McCoy and Lambert for outstanding service


BLACKSBURG, Va., May 24, 2005 – Vanessa McCoy of Blacksburg and Don Lambert of Giles County have received 2005 Employee Recognition Awards from the Virginia Tech College Association for Staff in Engineering (CASE) for their outstanding contributions and service to the college. McCoy and Lambert were honored during the annual CASE luncheon held on campus May 9.

McCoy, who joined the staff of Virginia Tech’s Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics in 1977, works for several professors, assisting in the preparation of technical papers and performing a number of departmental services.

“Her level of dedication is seen only rarely,” said Glenn Kraige, professor of engineering science and mechanics. “She is relentless in that she will simply not allow any project to be finished until it meets both her standards and those of the people with whom she is working.”

Lambert has worked in Virginia Tech’s Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) for the past seven years, organizing and tracking the department’s thousands of inventory items, from computers to laboratory equipment to office furniture.

“The department would be lost without Don’s ability to keep up with daily activities,” said Dennis Newman, director of ECE tech support. In addition to managing millions of dollars worth of inventory, Lambert ensures that ECE is in compliance with state and federal audits and currently is helping to implement a radio frequency system for locating equipment.

The College of Engineering at Virginia Tech is internationally recognized for its excellence in 14 engineering disciplines and computer science. The college’s 5,600 undergraduates benefit from an innovative curriculum that provides a “hands-on, minds-on” approach to engineering education, complementing classroom instruction with two unique design-and-build facilities and a strong Cooperative Education Program. With more than 50 research centers and numerous laboratories, the college offers its 2,000 graduate students opportunities in advanced fields of study such as biomedical engineering, state-of-the-art microelectronics, and nanotechnology.